• Day Tripping – Los Angeles Garment & Art District

    Hey there! A trip to pick up a few pieces of fabric turned into a day trip in L.A. Whenever I say I’m tired of California I’m reminded of just how MUCH culture we have here and for years, the art district has been one of those “I’ll check it out one day” so finally – I had time. How relaxing is it to be on your own schedule?  To be able to stroll around leisurely, popping into any and every garment shop to check out the different types of fabrics, unique trinkets to make just about anything your mind can come up with and then drive just a few…

  • Challenge Complete!

    Just over a month ago a co-worker and I were chatting about how rough life had been this year (only being March) and she suggested we try the 30 Days of Happiness Challenge.  Initially, I scoffed at the idea of any kind of challenge after having survived a fitness boot camp last year and when looking at some of the things we had to do, rolled my eyes are far back into my head as they could go. But I did it. Out of the thirty challenges presented, guess which was the most difficult for me to do and it happened to be on the first day?  No social media…

  • Women’s History Month

    Welcome to Day 1! As I close the books on Black History Month and transition to Women’s History Month please be warned – sometimes it may seem as if the two have become one.  Some of these posts will relate to the inequalities experience any some who are considered double minorities – being black and a woman. 1920. That was the year when the struggle for women’s voting rights changed with the passing of the 19th Amendment. This was an amazing achievement that was dubbed the suffrage movement but there’s one thing.  These rights didn’t apply to all women and black women were primarily left out of the cause and movement,…

  • Day 28- So Now What?

    Today marks the official end of Black History Month and let me tell you, this has been really interesting this time around. While initially it seemed as if we only had the same heroes to celebrate and same stories to tell, I pushed myself to find content that was fairly new or rarely talked about. There were moments where I was so proud, having been reminded of the many accomplishments. We are artists, inventors, scholars, business professionals, and most importantly we are survivors. For the 28 days in the month, there was a lot crammed into these posts, but there’s so much more I wanted to sh Like the basics;…

  • Day 27- How Do We Explain This Kind of Cruelty?

    **WARNING** This post contains graphic details. It’s a story that will once again bring up the dark side of American History and the horribly gruesome slaughter of a (9 months) pregnant, married and mother of two woman named Mary Turner. Here is how it all began… From May 17 through May 22, 1918, two counties in Georgia notorious for mass lynchings, took its reputation to a whole new level. After a wealthy white farmer named Hampton Smith, known for being extremely cruel to his workers was found shot and killed, a posse was assembled and an manhunt had begun for the men involved. One by one, the men were found…

  • Day 26- Who’s the Black Man on the $2 Bill?

    I just came across a photo on Instagram showing a $2 dollar bill and the caption read “First black U.S. President.  Stay woke!” Say what?!? Is this why the bill is so limited and many of us treat then like our lucky rabbit foot? I’m not so sure. First of all, I never even noticed there was a black man on the back of the bill and secondly the Internet needs to chill- we know who the first black president was and that would be one Hussein Barack Obama.  But now I’m curious when I grabbed one and took a closer look.  Who was he? If I believed what I read…

  • Day 25- Seneca Village Was Destroyed to Make Way for the Wealthy’s Nice Playground

    In the mid 19th century, New York decided a park was needed to appease the needs of a largely affluent group of people that were in need of a “fashionable and safe public place” for their families.  So in 1855, the city chose Seneca Village, a stretch of land along the Hudson River located between 82nd and 89th Streets and Seventh and Eighth Avenues.  Seneca Village had a population of 264 and existed from 1825 to 1857 in the area now known as Central Park.   The area may very well have been “Manhattan’s first prominent community of African American property owners”. By the 1850’s, black people in this community were 39 times…

  • Day 24 – Phillip A. Payton: The Father of Harlem

    The day really got away from me and I was heckled for trying to research and draft my post while at a gathering. Thanks Shavell! 😁 But I will not let you or myself down because I said I would bring it for the entire month. Welcome to Day 24 and the story of a black real estate pioneer named Phillip A. Payton Jr., who made his dream come true of placing black families in apartments in Harlem, New York. Phillip was born in Westfield, Massachusetts in 1876 and worked in the family business (hair) until moving to New York in 1889.  Do you remember my post a few weeks back…

  • Day 23 – Tracy Norman, First Black Transgender Model

    Today’s black history post has to do with a different kind of “passing”. Welcome to Day 23! Born a male in the 50’s, transitioned into a woman during the 70’s, and became a successful model until being outed during a photo shoot in 1980, bringing her career to a halt.  Tracy Gayle Norman was born a male December 15, 1952 and is recognized as the first black transgender model. Soon after graduating from high school in the late 60s, Tracy began taking hormone shots and losing weight. The changes in her body created a svelte figure and with her large eyes and sharp cheekbones, friends and family told her she could…